Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Half Baked or Fully Baked – A Morrill Connection?

By Don Taylor


I was recently asked to take a look at a friend’s family history.  Her grandfather was a Morrill from Portland, Maine, and the question arose if she related to Charles Morrill (the “M” in B & M Baked Beans).

1953 ad for B&M Baked Beans
1953 Ad for B&M Baked Beans
 (CC BY-NC 2.0)
I’ll admit I didn’t know much about B & M Baked Beans, ‘cept I like eating them.  But the Internet an excellent place and it took about 2 minutes to learn that Charles Sumner Morrill, Jr. (1833-1901) was a partner and founder of B&M Baked Beans in 1867.[i] Another Google search found a short genealogical tree for Charles Sumner Morrill, Jr. within an article regarding Morrill’s Corner[ii], a well-known area within Portland. Armed with those two bits of information and an abbreviated family tree that showed the names of my friend, her parents, and her grandparents, but little else.

Luckily, the process was straightforward. Using only Ancestry.Com, I was able to trace her ancestry back quickly.
           
Her Great grandfather was,
Edwin Jackson Morrill (1882-1943). His father was,
            Theodore J Morrill (1850-1911). His father was,
                        Edwin Morrell (1828-1897).  His father was,
                                    Peter W. Morrell (c. 1797-1881).  Connected to Morrill’s Corner history.  
                                                Peter Morrill, Esq. (1753-1819)
                                                            Peter Morrill (1709-1801)
                                                Steven Morrell (1739-1816)
                                    Asa Morrell (c. 1776, - c. 1830
Charles Morrill, (Sr.) (1811-1849)
            Charles Morrill, (Jr.) (1833-1901)

Peter was Charles’ 2nd Great grandfather.
Peter was my friend’s 6th  Great grandfather.

So yes, my friend is a third cousin, four times removed, of Charles Morrill of the B&M Baked Bean company fame.  

Note: I added a caveat that I did not double check and confirm every document and I did not have genealogical proof for the pedigree, but I was fairly certain of the various connections. I also did not extract all of the information I could from the records I did find.[iii]

ENDNOTES



[iii] Sources for all individuals are available on request but are quite involved, consisting of 5-10 sources for each individual.


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Sunday, May 22, 2016

Adair Ancestors: Luel Glazier (1912 -1997) #7


By – Don Taylor 


On my Adair project, it was time to step back and look at the life of Luel Glazier. Her life was filled with death all around her, first her only sibling, then her mother, and then her father.  Finally, she was widowed at only 43 years old.

Biography: Luel Glazier (1912 -1997)


Luel Glazier was born on December 22, 1912, in Luthersville, Georgia to Josephine Ophelia Lambert, age 25, and John Henry Glazier, age 39.

In 1914, her only sibling, Joan Glazier was born.

In 1917, when Luel was five years old, Luel’s sister, Joan, died.

In 1920, Luel Glazier lived in Hapeville, Georgia, with her father, a postal clerk, and her mother. Luel attended school.

Tragedy struck again in 1929 when Luel’s mother, Ophelia died.

309 Grant Park Place, Atlanta, GA Today
Photo courtest Google Maps.

Note: 309 South ave & 309 Grant Park Place
appear to be the same location.
By 1930, she and her widower father moved to 309 South Ave., Atlanta, Georgia. John Henry still worked as a postal clerk, Luel attended school.

The 1932 and 1933 Atlanta City Directories indicates Luel and her father lived at 309 South Ave., and 309 Grant Park Place, respectively. She was a student.

Tragedy struck again in 1934 when Luel’s father, John Henry Glazier died. The 22-year-old Luel was orphaned. She stayed at 309 Grant Park Place, for a short while; but we know she moved to Turin, Georgia, in 1935, but it isn’t clear where she was living, but presumed to have been with relatives.

In 1940, Luel was living with two uncles, Howard & Hibe Glazier on Glazier Road, near Turin, Georgia. Her uncles were farm and peach orchard supervisors and owned a farm.

Luel Glazier married Svend Christian Hansen on February 27, 1942, when she was 29 years old. Svend was 13 years her senior.

Svend and Luel had four children. At this time in her life, she had lived entirely in Georgia. In 1955, Svend and Luel moved to Arizona in support of treatment for Luel’s emphysema.  They loved at 505 W. Ajo Way in Tucson, AZ.

Although a house in 1955, 505 W. Ajo Way
is an insurance sales office today.
Six months later, Svend was in an auto accident. Family history says he didn’t get treatment. Shortly afterward Svend had a pulmonary embolism. On 12 November 1955, Svend died at the VA Hospital in Tucson, AZ.

Luel’s moved to South Carolina to be near her daughter, Dianne, whose husband was stationed there.

Luel Glazier Hansen died on December 5, 1997, in Aiken, South Carolina, when she was 84 years old.

Sources:


  • 1920 Census; John Glazier - Atlanta, Fulton, Georgia; ED 171, Sheet 9, Line 46; Ancestry.com.
  • 1930 Census; John Glazier - Atlanta, Fulton, Georgia; ED 48; Page: 23A; Ancestry.com.
  • 1940 Census; Howard Glazier - Turin, Coweta, Georgia; Roll; ED m38-24; Page: 4B; Ancestry.com.
  • Meehan Family Website; Patrick J Meehan; Anton Severin HANSEN / Petrine BRANGSTRUP; http://meehan.us/pages/tree/d0000/f0000051.html#I726.
  • U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995; Luel Glazier - Atlanta, Georgia, City Directory, 1932; Ancestry.com.
  • U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995; Luel Glazier - Atlanta, Georgia, City Directory, 1933; Ancestry.com.
  • U.S., Headstone Applications for Military Veterans, 1925-1963; Svend C Hansen; Ancestry.com.
  • U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007; Luel Glazier Hansen; Ancestry.com.
  • U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014; Luel G. Hansen [Glazier]; Ancestry.com.


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Thursday, May 19, 2016

War, Starvation, and Smallpox Decimate the Rode Family


By – Don Taylor 


I have many interesting stories in my family tree, but never have I found a story as heartbreaking, or as compelling, as the story I found regarding my friend’s family.  It is the kind of story that I would expect to see on Who Do You Think You Are, or some other television program. As I unraveled and confirmed the story facts of my friend’s ancestors and their lives, I was mesmerized as I read of the tragedy and inspired by the survival of these Rode (pronounced row-dee) ancestors.


Biography - Adolph Rode (1876-1954)


Adolph Rode was born 28 September 1876 in Poland.  At an early age, his family moved to the Ukraine where he grew up.

In 1902, he married Louise Rode.  Louise had the same surname as Adolph. However, there was no known relationship between the two.

Life as a farmer Ukraine was hard, but okay, and the young family prospered. They began having children. First Rudolph in 1903, Reinhold in 1905, and Leonard in 1906. Another boy was born about 1908, a girl about 1910, then another boy in 1911. Knowing the unrest in the Ukraine and sensing that a great conflict should soon envelop Russia and all of Europe. Because the turmoil in the Ukraine, Adolph decided to seek his fortune in America and save his family from the ravages of war. In 1913, Adolph left his wife and six small children in the Ukraine with the intention of obtaining employment in the United States and sending money back to them for them to join him a year or two.  Adolph arrived in New York on 25 April 1913. Adolph then made his way and settled in Nebraska and set himself to work on getting his family to join him.

Discover you family history through historical newspapers at Newspapers.com Then, before Adolph could send for his wife and children, the Imperial Russian Army invaded the Ukraine on 18 August 1914.  The Army pillaged the Ukraine as it prepared to invade Austria to crush the Austrian-Hungary Army. Adolph’s greatest worries came to fruition. War came to the Ukraine, and he hadn’t been able to get his wife and children to the safety of America before the war had come. He wasn’t quick enough to earn the money necessary to send for his family.  He frantically tried to contact his wife and children but couldn’t. Finally, he received word that the Russians destroyed his farmstead in the Ukraine, and his entire family was dead.

Even after the war ended on 11 November 1918, Adolph’s reasons for living, having a reunion with his family, were gone. The 1920 Census shows Adolph as a hired hand living with the Fred Settje family in Dimick, Stanton County, Nebraska. To his credit, he hadn’t given up all hope as he identified himself as married, and not widowed, in the census.

The years passed, then in 1922, nine years after he left the Ukraine, another Ukrainian contacted him and told him that his wife was alive. His wife had lost his address during the war and finally contacted this compatriot.

Photo of starving children, Ukraine, 1922 - [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Children affected by famine in
Ukraine - 1922
In a flurry of letters, Adolph learned that his homestead in the Ukraine had, in fact, been pillaged and destroyed. He family became refugees and moved between various countries during the nine years.  One of his four sons had died of starvation. His only daughter had died of smallpox.  But, Louisa and four of his children were still alive. He quickly sent money for his two oldest boys, Rudolph and Reinhold, to come to the States. They would be able to earn more money in the United States than they would in Europe.  Bringing the rest of the family to America was paramount. On 26 September 1922, the two boys arrived in New York and made their way to Nebraska as quickly as possible.

It took nearly a year for the three to earn enough money to bring Louisa and the two younger boys, Leonard and Otto, to America. But on 4 August 1923, Louisa and family arrived in New York.  Within days they were reunited with Adolph in Nebraska.

In December 1926, Adolph and Louisa welcomed another daughter into the family. Margaret would be their last child.

The 1930 Census indicates Adolph and Louisa were renting a farm in Slough, Pierce County, Nebraska. Adolph could not speak English in 1930 but could read and speak German. Living with him were his wife, son Rudolph, and daughter, little three-year-old Margaret.

In 1935, Adolph was living in rural Pierce County, Nebraska. And by 1940, they had moved to Willow Township, Antelope County, Nebraska where Adolph, Louise, and daughter Margaret lived next door to his son Reinhold and Reinhold’s family of wife and four children. Sometime between 1930 and 1940 Adolph and Louise became U.S. citizens.
Marker - Adolph & Louise Rode
Courtesy: Find-a-Grave

Adolph died on 6 March 1954 and is buried at Zion Cemetery in Norfolk, Madison County, Nebraska. His wife Louisa died within the year on 1 February 1955 and is buried with Adolph.

Further Actions: 

Order copies of the Alien Case Files from the National Archives.

List of Greats

1. Aldolph Rode

Sources:


1920 Census; Adolph Rode; Dimick, Stanton, Nebraska; ED 204, Sheet 8B, Line 65; Family Search.

1930 Census; Adolph Rohde (Rode) - Slough, Pierce Nebraska, Sheet 4A, Line 12; Family Search.

1940 Census; Adolph Rode - Willow Twp, Antelope, Nebraska - ED 2-32, Sheet 4A, family 63; Family Search.

Find A Grave; Adolph Rode - #57149363; Findagrave.com

The Lincoln Star (Lincoln, Nebraska); 1941-01-05 - Page 29; Nebraska and Nebraskans; Holiday Story; Neligh News - Adolph Rode; Newspapers.Com

New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957; Rudolph and Rheihold Rode - SS Caronia 1922; Ancestry.Com

U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995; 1922 City Directory, Norfolk, Nebraska - Adolph Rode - Farmer, Madison, Madison, Nebraska; Ancestry.Com


newspapers.com newspapers.com

Monday, May 16, 2016

List of Kings from the William King Scrapbook


William King Scrapbook

Page 28 - List of Kings 


Amanuensis Monday

[We have a project at the Scarborough (Maine) Historical Society (SHS) where we are scanning and digitizing scrapbooks.  Most of the pages are newspaper clippings and other documents which lend themselves to optical character recognition (OCR); however, there are also pages that are handwritten.  To make those pages searchable within the final PDF document, I have been transcribing them as needed.]

Scrapbook, accession number 62.74.4, is a scrapbook of William King which was donated to the SHS in 1962. Its contents are mostly newspaper clippings. The clippings go back to 1905 and the most recent clipping appears to be from 1952. The majority of the clippings are undated. The handwritten pages appear to be mostly genealogical lists of individuals that are ancestors of the King family and are also undated. This list is from Page 28, as identified in the scrapbook index. The original was scanned at 2550 × 3509 and is available at the SHS Museum. The original image was duplicated, cropped, resized for the web to 564 × 508, and is displayed here.


The following is my transcription of this document:

Richard King. Born 1761 Died Oct 27th 1830. Age 69 years
Hannah King. Born June 22 - 1771 - Died May 25 - 1845 age 74 years.


Cyrus King Born May 4 1790
Mary King   “      Oct 12 1791
Wm King            Jan 13 1794
Eliza King           Aug 31 1796
Joseph L, King   Jan 22 1799
Robert S King    Feb 28 1801
Benjamin S. B. King  Jan 11 1803
Jane Ann King    Mar 9 1805
Fidealia H King   Jan 9 1808
Robert S King     Mar 14 1811
Miranda S. King  Aug 9 1813

Transcribed by Don Taylor
Scarborough Historical Society
14 Apr 2016


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Friday, May 13, 2016

Barnett Surname

Surname Saturday


I only have one known direct Barnett ancestor, my 5th great grandmother, Catherine Barnett (Ancestor #209) on the Brown line. However, I have some 35 other known Barnetts identified in my family tree. Several Barnetts married into the Mannin and Brown families in my research, so even though I only have one direct Barnett ancestor, the Barnett surname is important in my research.
  

Barnett Name Meaning


There are two major threads of discussion regarding the meaning of the surname Barnett.

First is that it is a habitational name, relating to where people lived. Once source suggests that the name comes from a town in Hertfordshire, and the name of several parishes in that county. It also suggests it refers to towns in Middlesex and Lincoln.[i] Another source suggests the name derives from Old English bærnet ‘place cleared by burning’.[ii]

A second thread indicates that the name is a variant of Bernard or “the son of Barnard”.[iii] Barnard was a popular name in the 13th century and the Cistercian monk, Saint Barnard, provided impetus to the name’s use. Other popular variants of Barnett include Barnet and Barnette.

Geographical


I do not know where Catherine Barnett or her ancestors came from. But a good guess would be from England. The New York Passenger Lists on Ancestry indicates that more than half of the New York Passengers with the surname Barnett came from England. My Catherine was probably born in Virginia about 1782. If that is the case, her ancestors never immigrated, rather they just relocated to the colonies.

In1840 there were 71 Barnett households in Virginia and another 119 in Kentucky.[iv]
 Although Catherine married Meredith Mannin about 1797, I’m sure she had plenty of Barnett relatives in the area. Catherine appears to have died in Kentucky sometime before 1862.           

My Direct Barnett Ancestors


#209 – Catherine Barnett (1782-c.1862) – Generation 8
#104 – Meridith Mannin (1801-1885) – Generation 7
#52 – Enoch Mannin (1819-1907) – Generations 6
#26 – John William Manning (1845-1888) - Generations 5
#13 – Mary Elizabeth Manning (1874-1983) - Generation 4
#6 – Richard Earl Brown (1903-1990) (aka Richard Durand, aka Clifford Brown) – G3
My mother - Generation 2
Me - Generation 1

My known relatives.


My records have 865 direct-line descendants of Catherine Barnett identified in my known Brown/Montran tree, which is about 19% of my entire tree are descendants of Catherine Barnett.

ENDNOTES





[i] Patronymica Britannica, written: 1838-1860 by Mark Antony Lower via Forebears http://forebears.io/surnames/barnett#meaning
[ii] Source: Dictionary of American Family Names ©2013, Oxford University Press via Ancestry http://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=Barnett
[iii] ibid.
[iv] Barnett Family History, Ancestry; http://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=barnett



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